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totalBRAINtotalMIND Vol. 1: An Integrated Brain/Mind Architecture

tBtM Vol.1 contains the following parts:

P1: Introduction: toward an integrated brain/mind architecture P2: A Cognitive Architecture P3: Total Brain: Structure, development, function, and, an integrated architecture P4: The Dreaming Brain

tBtM Vol.1 is a substantial work:

Number of pages – 513 Number of text pages – 400 Number of words in text pages - 184,000 Number of diagrams – 68 Number of dynamic powerpoint videos – 61

tBtM Vol.1 has an extensive bibliography (over 2000 references) including:

A wide range of research related to dual processing systems A comprehensive body research on the cerebellum (for psychiatry & psychology) A substantial amount of brain research on dream sleep

tBtM Vol. 1 has unique features including:

A ‘systematic’ integration of neurology and psychology within a control systems architecture An epistemologically based understanding of the ‘complementary’ nature dual processing systems A modern interpretation of Gestalt cognition in terms of artificial intelligence concepts An innovative description of brain systems, with a major role for the cerebellum in psychology A neuroepistemological understanding of the central importance of dream sleep in cognition

Video Introduction to totalBRAINtotalMIND Vol.1

Look inside tBtM Volume 1:

Scroll down for:

  • Preface
  • Table of Contents
  • Sample Pages

tBtM Vol.1 Preface:

totalBRAINtotalMIND Vol.1 ‘An Integrated Brain/Mind Architecture’, incorporates recent advances from research in AI/cybernetics, neuroscience and psychology.  It presents an innovative control systems architecture of brain/mind that is both biologically and psychologically meaningful, and that integrates neurology and psychology in a systematic and useful manner. The main objectives of the work are to:

(1) produce an epistemologically based developmental model of the operating characteristics of the mind.

(2) produce an empirically supported ‘control systems’ description of the development and operating characteristics of the human brain (based on data concerning neural development, structure, and function).

(3) relate the epistemologically based developmental model of the operating characteristics of the human mind (from 1), to the empirically based ‘control systems’ description of the development and operating characteristics of the human brain (from 2), and do so in terms of the ‘common underlying process principles’ of homeostasis, thereby producing a ‘systematically’ integrated neurocognitive architecture.

(1) An epistemologically based developmental model of the operating characteristics of the human mind: Presented at first as a general cognitive architecture, this ‘theoretical model’ encapsulates the result of my attempt to answer the question “What are the requirements for the evolution of a cognitive architecture that can develop mental models which equip it to control its interaction with the environment in such a way as to maximize the effectiveness of a learning based extension of homeostatic control?”. The model is developed on the basis of a range of ideas and observations from various knowledge bases including: epistemology/philosophy; information representation/processing theories (AI); control theory and robotics; and, various branches of psychology. In doing so, it also takes into account a wealth of research on dual processing systems. This general architecture is then used as an integrative framework in terms of which to systematically describe and inter-relate, in detail, psychological processes including: motivation and emotion; automaticity and skill acquisition; attention; levels of consciousness and control; imagination; simulation and planning; ‘Gestalt’perception/thinking; verbal thought; problem solving; induction; intuition; the process of schema updating; and, the related process of dream sleep. Through the incorporation of this detail, the general architecture is made more psychologically meaningful.

(2) A ‘control systems’ description of the development and operating characteristics of the human brain: This section is the result of my enderavour to answer the following related questions:- What are the main component ‘systems’ of the brain? What is their biological order of evolution? What are their information representation and processing characteristics? What is their ‘control systems’ relationship to each other, in terms of their role in facilitating homeostasis? The description is developed with reference to observations, ‘models’ and theories from various fields of neuroscience including:- neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neural development (phylogeny & ontogeny), and an extensive range of neuro-‘function’ oriented research. In doing so, the description takes into account a wealth of research on the cerebellum, as well as the cerebrum. As a biological starting point, the most basic ‘anatomical design’ of the brain is considered from the perspective of the unfoldment of the neural tube. Accordingly, the brain is considered to be composed of three main components:- brain stem, cerebellum, and cerebrum. These three main components are then presented as a three tier nested control hierarchy and regarded as the ‘core architecture’. This core architecture is then elaborated by systematic development in a stepwise manner, to take into account not only ‘vertical’ (e.g. limbic) subsystems, but also ‘horizontal’ (lateralised) subsystems, eventually resulting in an integrated complex architecture of nine nested subsystems.

(3) A ‘systematically’ integrated neurocognitive architecture is summarised. Then, brain research on various psychological processes is related to the integrated architecture. These processes include: motivation and emotion; automaticity and skill acquisition; attention; levels of consciousness and control; speech, reading and writing; working memory; imagination; simulation and planning; problem solving; intuition; and, in particular, the important and extensively researched process of REM/dream sleep

tBtM Vol.1 Table of Contents

Vol.1, Part 1 (V1, P1)  INTRODUCTION: toward an integrated brain/mind architecture

V1,P1, 1.000 A BIOLOGICAL BASIS FOR UNDERSTANDING BEHAVIOR AND COGNITION

V1,P1, 2.000 COGNITIVE ARCHITECTURE

V1,P1, 3.000 NEURAL ARCHITECTURE:

V1,P1, 4.000 INTEGRATION: PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATION

 

Vol.1, Part 2 (V1, P2) A COGNITIVE ARCHITECTURE

V1,P2, 1.000 THE REPRESENTATION AND PROCESSING OF INFORMATION

V1,P2, 1.100 Representation and processing of information for control, thought and ‘inner life’

V1,P2, 1.200 Primary level representation and processing of information

V1,P2, 1.300 Information may be represented in different ways

V1,P2, 1.400 Naturomorphic class of information representation and processing. including:-

1.420 Analogical representation/processing, embodied cognition and simulation, and similarity

1.430 Characteristics of connectionist-type systems

1.440 Gestalt psychology

1.450 Imagistic representation and processing

V1,P2, 1.500 Abstract category of information representation and processing

V1,P2, 1.600 Updating internal representations

V1,P2, 1.700 Communication between naturomorphic and abstract forms of information representation and processing

V1,P2, 1.800 An information processing perspective on some basic component  processes in problem solving

V1,P2, 2.000 LEARNING BASED REGULATORY CONTROL

V1,P2, 2.100 Homeostatic control and its learning based elaboration

V1,P2, 2.200 Naturomorphic learning based control

V1,P2, 2.300 Abstract learning based control

V1,P2, 2.400 The naturomorphic and abstract hybrid system: some operational features of dual control

V1,P2, 2.500 Attention

V1,P2, 2.600 Error in relation to learning based adaptive control, and the updating process

V1,P2, 2.700 Automaticity,  routines, skills, and sub‑programming

V1,P2, 2.800 Executive processes and offline processing

V1,P2, 2.900 Elaboration of core architecture to incorporate  processes of  selective attention, translation, and sub-programming

V1,P2, 3.000 NON-CONSCIOUS & CONSCIOUS LEARNING BASED REGULATORY CONTROL

V1,P2, 3.100 Non- (un-) conscious processes and non- (un-) conscious control

V1,P2, 3.200 Aspects of consciousness/awareness and conscious  control

V1,P2, 4.000 SUMMARY OF KEY POINTS CONCERNING COGNITIVE ARCHITECTURE

V1,P2, 4.100 Summary of key points concerning the representation  and processing of information

V1,P2, 4.200 Summary of key points concerning learning based regulatory control

 

Vol.1 Part 3 (V1, P3) TOTAL BRAIN: Structure, development, function, and an integrate neurocognitive architecture

V1,P3, 1.000 INTRODUCTION: BASIC STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF THE BRAIN

V1,P3, 1.100 A simple perspective on the brain

V1,P3, 1.200 Basic development of the brain in terms of brain stem, cerebellum, and cerebrum

V1,P3, 2.000 BRAIN STEM: MORE DETAILED STRUCTURE AND SOME ATTRIBUTED FUNCTIONS

V1,P3, 2.100 Brain stem – general structure

V1,P3, 2.200 The Brain Stem – general function

V1,P3, 2.300 Brain stem/reticular formation and reticular activating system

V1,P3, 2.400 Brain stem neurotransmitters and neuromodulation

V1,P3, 2.500 Thalamencephalon

V1,P3, 2.600 Summary of the basic functions of the brain stem

V1,P3, 3.000 CEREBELLUM: MORE DETAILED STRUCTURE AND SOME ATTRIBUTED FUNCTIONS

V1,P3, 3.100 Introduction

V1,P3, 3.200 The cerebellum – a ‘second brain’. including: -

3.230 Cerebellum: sensory information processor

3.240 Cerebellum, learning and memory

V1,P3, 3.300  Information representation and processing characteristics of the cerebellum. including:-

3.340 Connectionist theory: ‘in principle’ capabilities of the cerebellum from an information representation and processing perspective

3.350 Gestalt theory: ‘in principle’ capabilities of the cerebellum from a psychological perspective

V1,P3, 4.000 CEREBRUM: MORE DETAILED STRUCTURE AND SOME ATTRIBUTED FUNCTIONS

V1,P3, 4.100 Introduction: general function of the cerebrum as a whole

V1,P3, 4.200 Cerebrum: anatomical differentiation of the neural tube

V1,P3, 4.300 Cerebral cortex: differentiation in terms of anatomy and/or function

V1,P3, 5.000 CEREBELLUM AND CEREBRUM: A BRIEF COMPARISON OF FUNDAMENTAL ATTRIBUTES

V1,P3, 5.100 Fundamental attributes in terms of cognitive architecture

V1,P3, 5.200 Major similarities of the cerebellum and cerebrum in terms of anatomy and physiology

V1,P3, 5.300 Major differences of the cerebellum and cerebrum in terms of anatomy and physiology

V1,P3, 5.400 Differences between cerebellum and cerebrum in terms of representation and processing

V1,P3, 5.500 Cerebellum and cerebrum: a hybrid architecture

V1,P3, 5.600 Two brains in control

V1,P3, 5.700 Initial elaboration of the block diagram representation of the brainstem, cerebellum and cerebrum, and learning based control systems, taking  into  account some neurological detail: a five sub-system architecture

V1,P3, 6.000 INTERACTION OF THE CEREBELLUM AND CEREBRUM

V1,P3, 6.100 Introduction

V1,P3, 6.200 The cerebellum and cerebrum in learning based control

V1,P3, 7.000 Various cognitive processes considered in relation to brain stem, cerebellum and cerebrum

V1,P3, 7.100 Perception

V1,P3, 7.200 Attention

V1,P3, 7.300 Automaticity & implicit, un/non-conscious processing

V1,P3, 7.400 Emotion

V1,P3, 7.500 Imagination

V1,P3, 7.600 ‘Consciousness’

V1,P3, 7.700 Working memory

V1,P3, 7.800 Cerebellum in higher order ‘cognitive’ processes ?

V1,P3, 8.000 LATERALISATION OF FUNCTION WITHIN THE BRAIN

V1,P3, 8.100 Introduction

V1,P3, 8.200 Cerebral lateralisation: hemispheres

V1,P3, 8.300 Interaction of the cerebrocortical hemispheres with subcortical regions

V1,P3, 8.400 Lateralisation within the cerebellum

V1,P3, 8.500 Lateralisation within the brain stem

V1,P3, 8.600 Summary

V1,P3, 9.000 AN INTEGRATED A NEUROCOGNITIVE ARCHITECTURE, AND SOME LEVELS OF ELABORATION

V1,P3, 9.100 Elaborations of the core architecture

V1,P3, 9.200 Summary

V1,P3, 9.300 Application

V1,P3,10.000 APPENDIX: some other descriptions of brain function in terms of anatomical divisions, ‘functional systems’ and  ‘evolutionary levels’

 

Vol 1, Part 4 (V1, P4) DREAMING BRAIN

V1,P4, 1.000 INTRODUCTION

V1,P4, 1.100 Brief overview of ideas on dream sleep & dreaming from early writings (over 50 years ago)

V1,P4, 1.200 The importance of neurophysiology to a psychological understanding of dreaming

V1,P4, 2.000 NEUROLOGICAL FEATURES OF SLEEP AND DREAM SLEEP

V1,P4, 2.100 General conditions during sleep

V1,P4, 2.200 Outline description of the stages of sleep (in terms of EEG activity)

V1,P4, 2.300 Characteristics of NREM sleep

V1,P4, 2.400 Paradoxical sleep and REM sleep

V1,P4, 3.000 SLEEP AND DREAMING: GENERAL BIOLOGICAL REGULATION

V1,P4, 3.100 Homeostatic aspects of sleep and REM

V1,P4, 3.200 The timing of the sleep dream cycle

V1,P4, 4.000 THE PHYLOGENY AND ONTOGENY OF ‘DREAMING’

V1,P4, 4.100 Phylogeny of ‘dreaming’: REM activity

V1,P4, 4.200 Ontogeny of REM activity

V1,P4, 4.300 Childhood REM and dreaming

V1,P4, 5.000 BRAIN STEM, SLEEP AND DREAMING

V1,P4, 5.100 Introduction

V1,P4, 5.200 Dreams & neurotransmitters

V1,P4, 5.300 Thalamus in sleep, NREM sleep, and REM/dream sleep

V1,P4, 6.000 CEREBELLUM AND SLEEP/DREAMING

V1,P4, 6.100 Indicators of cerebellar involvement in sleep processes

V1,P4, 6.200 Effects of cerebellar lesion or ablation on D/REM sleep

V1,P4, 6.300 Neuronal activity in cerebellum (cortex and nuclei)

V1,P4, 6.400 Features of cerebellar neuronal acivity within D/REM  sleep

V1,P4, 6.500 The cerebellum as a contributor to D/REM sleep?

V1,P4, 6.600 Dream sleep as a cerebro-cerebellar dialogue

V1,P4, 6.700 Cerebellar activity in SWS/NREM

V1,P4, 6.800 Summary of the role of the cerebellum in sleep and dreaming

V1,P4, 6.900 Neurotransmitters/neurtomodulators in relation to cerebro-cerebellar interaction

V1,P4, 7.000 CEREBRUM,  SLEEP AND DREAMING

V1,P4, 7.100 Cerebral cortex

V1,P4, 7.200 Cerebral nuclei

V1,P4, 7.300 Limbic system and related subcortical circuits

V1,P4, 7.400 Lateralisation of cerebral hemisphere function in relation to dreaming

V1,P4, 7.500 Summary of cererbal level involvement in REM sleep and dreaming

V1,P4, 8.000 SOME ‘MODELS’ OF THE DREAMING PROCESS

V1,P4, 8.100 Dreaming: subcortically driven “bottom-up” or cortically driven “top-down”

V1,P4, 8.200 Origins of dreaming: subcortically driven “bottom-up”

V1,P4, 8.300 Formation of dreams: cortically driven “top-down”

V1,P4, 8.400 Dreaming as interaction between subcortical and cortical systems

V1,P4, 8.500 Hobson’s integrative AIM model

V1,P4, 8.600 When is a dream a dream?

V1,P4, 9.000 AN OVERVIEW OF NEUROPHYSIOLOGY AND PSYCHOLOGY OF DREAMING IN TERMS OF INFORMATION REPRESENTATION AND PROCESSING CHARACTERISTICS

V1,P4, 9.100 The information representation and processing characteristics of dreams

V1,P4, 9.200 How dreams are constructed

V1,P4, 9.300 What purpose dreams might serve

V1,P4, 10.000 D/REM SLEEP: SOME UNUSUAL CONDITIONS OF EXPRESSION

V1,P4, 10.100 REM sleep disorder & paradoxical sleep without atonia

V1,P4, 10.200 Dreaming & hallucinations/schizophrenia

V1,P4, 11.000 AN INTEGRATED SYSTEMIC DESCRIPTION OF DREAM SLEEP AND DREAMING

V1,P4, 11.100 A systematic approach  to describing the processes entailed in  ‘dreaming’

V1,P4, 11.200 An integrated description of the dreaming process, relating cognitive architecture (information representation  and processing systems) to neurophysiology

V1,P4, 11.300 Summary BIBLIOGRAPHY

tBtM Vol.1 Sample Pages

 

“A number of free ‘mini-papers’ pertaining to the contents of totalBRAINtotalMIND Volumes 1-4 are available here.”

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